With virus rampant, Scott administration eyes pandemic resumption

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Across Vermont, community levels of Covid-19 are considered low according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vermont’s health commissioner described the virus as “endemic” during the governor’s weekly press conference on Tuesday, and now the Scott administration is focused on recovering from the pandemic. State leaders are encouraging Vermonters to regain a sense of normalcy and socialize with others, as it is good for mental health and well-being. But everyone has a different comfort level and fully bouncing back will take some time. “The fact is, some of the steps we’ve taken, from remote learning to delayed healthcare and a general lack of human connection, have been difficult to overcome,” Governor Phil Scott said. The administration focuses particularly on revitalizing the health and education systems. Vermont has $280 million in federal funds for education that must be spent by September 2024. The funds can not only meet the immediate needs of students, but also ensure they have a long-term impact on improving the quality of our education system,” said Sec. Dan French from the Education Agency. In the short term, this means focusing on students’ academic needs due to learning loss, in addition to social/emotional needs. In the long term, AOE will focus on building strong education systems in each school system as well as better integrating social services with education. The state has also pledged to address the negative impacts of Covid-19 mitigation strategies over the past two years. “These have impacted our mental health, our substance use, our housing, the well-being of children and families, and the stability of our health care system,” said Agency Secretary Jenney Samuelson. social services. In working to address these issues, AHS will measure success by examining the number of Vermonters accessing mental health services, monitoring available beds in health care facilities and tracking households in emergency housing. The overarching goal is to strengthen communities as the state enters the endemic phase of Covid-19. “None of these challenges will have simple solutions, but I know we are all focused and eager to help keep Vermonters safe and healthy,” said Vermont Health Commissioner DM Mark Levine. that the virus is endemic, he said not everyone has necessarily arrived at an endemic lifestyle and the state will be in a transitional phase for some time.

Across Vermont, community levels of Covid-19 are considered low according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Vermont’s health commissioner described the virus as “endemic” during the governor’s weekly press conference on Tuesday, and now the Scott administration is focused on recovering from the pandemic.

State leaders are encouraging Vermonters to regain a sense of normalcy and socialize with others, as it is good for mental health and well-being. But everyone has a different comfort level and fully bouncing back will take time.

“The fact is, some of the steps we’ve taken, from remote learning to delayed healthcare and a general lack of human connection, have been difficult to overcome,” Gov. Phil Scott said.

The administration is particularly focused on revitalizing the health and education systems. Vermont has $280 million in federal education funds that must be spent by September 2024.

“The challenge before us now is to ensure that these one-time funds can not only meet the immediate needs of students, but also ensure that they have a long-term impact on improving the quality of our education system” , said Sec. Dan French with the Education Agency.

In the short term, this means focusing on the academic needs of students due to learning loss, in addition to social/emotional needs. In the long term, AOE will focus on building strong education systems in each school system as well as better integrating social services with education.

The state has also pledged to address the negative impacts of Covid-19 mitigation strategies over the past two years.

“These have impacted our mental health, our substance use, our housing, the well-being of children and families, and the stability of our health care system,” said Agency Secretary Jenney Samuelson. social services.

In working to address these issues, AHS will measure success by examining the number of Vermonters accessing mental health services, monitoring available beds in health care facilities and tracking households in emergency housing.

The overarching goal is to strengthen communities as the state enters the endemic phase of Covid-19.

“None of these challenges will have simple solutions, but I know we are all focused and eager to help keep Vermonters safe and healthy,” said Vermont Health Commissioner Dr. Mark Levine.

Although the virus is endemic, he said not everyone has necessarily arrived at an endemic lifestyle and the state will be in a transitional phase for some time.

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