Pete Evans’ hippie commune of 392 homes rejected by regional planning panel

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A $ 39 million commune project backed by anti-vaxxer and former celebrity chef Pete Evans was pushed back by a regional planning panel.

The Nightcap on Minjungbal development was to have 392 homes on 21 lots on 1,584.34 hectares of land on Mount Burrell in Tweed Shire, North New South Wales.

But it was refused Wednesday by the Northern Regional Planning Panel, reports The Courier Mail.

Reverse: A proposed $ 39 million commune backed by anti-vaxxer and former celebrity chef Pete Evans (pictured) was pushed back by a regional planning panel

The reasons for the rejection “included proposed land clearing at an estimated cost of $ 27 million”, as well as excessive housing, impact on wildlife and “insufficient information” in the application.

Despite the fact that the development would lead to a younger population seeking affordable housing in the area, the request was unanimously rejected by all panel members.

The proposal was first presented to the Tweed Shire Council in January by NCV Enterprises Pty Ltd, led by Helensvale resident Cherie Frances Stokes.

Evans, best known for his role in Seven’s My Kitchen Rules, as well as his debunked views on vaccines, has previously admitted to being “part” of the development, but maintains he did not create the project.

Rejected: The Nightcap on Minjungbal development (site in photo) was expected to have 392 homes on 21 lots on 1,584.34 hectares of land on Mount Burrell in Tweed Shire, northern New South Wales

Rejected: The Nightcap on Minjungbal development (site in photo) was expected to have 392 homes on 21 lots on 1,584.34 hectares of land on Mount Burrell in Tweed Shire, northern New South Wales

Denied: it was refused by the Northern Regional Planning Panel, for reasons such as excessive housing, impact on wildlife and

Denied: it was refused by the Northern Regional Planning Panel, for reasons such as excessive housing, impact on wildlife and “insufficient information” in the application

The setback comes after Evans brushed aside questions about the controversial hippie community last month, calling a reporter “fake news.”

The fallen television star had previously appeared in promotional videos for the Nightcap on Minjungbald program, which promised healing centers, a “sacred geometry pub” and solar-powered booths.

The now-dumped business in Mount Burrell near Nimbin in the Byron Bay hinterland has long raised eyebrows with a crowd of mum and dad investors saying they had been left thousands of dollars out of pocket by the same developer in a past company.

Evans looked gaunt and was noticeably shaking when confronted with a film crew from Channel Nine’s A Current Affair about the bizarre development.

Confused: A wide-eyed and tousled Pete Evans (pictured) (pictured) last month brushed off questions about the controversial hippie commune he was promoting by calling a reporter

Confused: A wide-eyed and tousled Pete Evans (pictured) (pictured) last month brushed off questions about the controversial hippie commune he was promoting by calling a reporter “fake news”

Disclaimer: Evans, best known for his role in Seven's My Kitchen Rules, as well as his debunked views on vaccines, once admitted to having

Disclaimer: Evans, best known for his role in Seven’s My Kitchen Rules, as well as his debunked views on vaccines, once admitted to being “part” of the development, but maintains he did not create the project

But the 5G conspiracy theorist was quick to dismiss the charges.

“Nightcap is a wonderful project that I can’t wait to be a part of,” he told veteran journalist Steve Marshall.

“I didn’t create it. You understand that, don’t you. I am not selling anything.

“You promote fake news over and over again. “

At the center of the controversy is the fact that the The shared housing community is expected to be built on the same site where a similar project recently failed – leaving creditors and potential residents more than $ 2.5 million.

The community village of Bhula Bhula, a settlement where people paid up to $ 160,000 each to live off-grid in “land vessels” made from collapsed tires in 2017, leaving a trail of legal clashes in its wake .

There is no suggestion of irregularity in the development of Nightcap.

Adrian Brennock, the sole manager of the company that owns the land, has put the business under voluntary administration, but now he is back on marketing the 3,500 acres of land with Evans’ help.

Developer Adrian Brennock said the area has unlimited water and sunlight for solar power

Developer Adrian Brennock said the area has unlimited water and sunlight for solar power

Mr Brennock in a promotional clip says the township will act as a “sanctuary” to protect residents from disasters that may arise in the outside world.

“If we are locked in or there are food shortages, or whatever disasters befall us in the future, we are here able to be completely self-sufficient,” he said.

Investor funds are intended for business development at the site, which will include businesses such as gas stations and pubs that can generate income that will flow back into the community.

Community centers, a “sacred geometry pub”, a medical center and healing centers are also designed to be erected on the ground, under the ethic of the sanctuary: “do no harm”.

But as it stands, the development project has yet to receive council approval.

People can buy land and then build their own home.  In the photo, a blue for a potential cabin

People can buy land and then build their own home. In the photo, a blue for a potential cabin

Despite this, fanatic Evans fans can purchase a block of land at Nightcap Development for $ 290,000.

Tony McMurtry, Mr Brennock’s brother, said: “A lot of people seem to think he’s responsible for what went wrong before, which he isn’t.”

But an investor who shelled out $ 80,000 for land on the previous site said he didn’t believe a word from the developers and Evans.

“We are constantly getting emails saying everything will be ready for you in a month and it has been going on for two years,” said the investor.

“I have no faith in these people, the trust is totally broken.”

The approval of Evans’ land comes after a litany of controversies that saw the My Kitchen Rules host fined and banned on social media platforms.

Fanatic Evans fans (pictured) can purchase a block of land at Nightcap development for $ 290,000

Fanatic Evans fans (pictured) can purchase a block of land at Nightcap development for $ 290,000

In a documentary, the developers said there is a lot of wood from surrounding structures (pictured) which can be used by people to build their own homes

In a documentary, the developers said there is a lot of wood from surrounding structures (pictured) which can be used by people to build their own homes

The site was recently purchased for $ 2 million and previously housed a similar project that collapsed, owing future residents and creditors $ 2.5 million, they claim (Mr Brennock pictured at right)

The site was recently purchased for $ 2 million and previously housed a similar project that collapsed, owing future residents and creditors $ 2.5 million, they claim (Mr Brennock pictured at right)

A map of the construction site where potential residents can buy shares in the company that owns the land in exchange for an exclusive lot

A map of the construction site where potential residents can buy shares in the company that owns the land in exchange for an exclusive lot


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