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FV hospital selected as vaccination center for the French community in southern Vietnam | Society

Before being selected by the Consulate of France to vaccinate the southern French community, the FV hospital actively participated in the vaccination campaign in HCM City, vaccinating 6,800 cases in five days (Photo courtesy of the ‘FV hospital)

Hanoi (VNA) – The FV hospital has been selected by the Consulate of France in Ho Chi Minh City as a vaccination center for the French community living in southern Vietnam.

With the approval of the Vietnamese government, the French government transferred the COVID-19 vaccine to Vietnam to support the vaccination of French community In Vietnam. The Consulate General of France has chosen the FV hospital as a vaccination center for nearly 5,000 French residents living in southern Vietnam. This equates to almost 10,000 injections.

All French nationals over the age of 18 and their spouses (married or contracted) are eligible, as well as all employees (and their spouses) exercising a French diplomatic activity.

The French consulate in HCM City is responsible for delivering the COVID-19 vaccine to Tan Son Nhat airport with the authorization of the Vietnamese Ministry of Health. The vaccine will be transported to Vietnam in diplomatic cases. The VF hospital will receive and transport the vaccines to the hospital vaccine storage facility. Simultaneously, the FV hospital will organize the vaccination schedule during the third week of this month.

The FV hospital selected as a vaccination center for the French community in southern Vietnam hinh anh 2(Photo courtesy of FV Hospital)


The vaccine transferred to Vietnam for this vaccination campaign is mRNA, produced by Moderna. The FV Hospital pharmacy department is certified and qualified to store and preserve COVID-19 vaccines. The VF hospital can hold 800,000 doses of Astra-Zeneca vaccine with a required temperature of 2 to 8 degrees Celsius; 200,000 doses of Moderna with a required temperature of -20 degrees Celsius to -40 degrees Celsius; and ultra-cold freezers to store and store up to 600,000 doses of Pfizer vaccine with a required temperature of -90 degrees Celsius to -60 degrees Celsius.

The vaccination service will be provided by the FV hospital during office hours, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Monday to Friday) and from 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. (Saturday). It is estimated that FV Hospital vaccinate about 500 people per day. As a result, the first dose will be completed within 10 days. The second dose will be given four weeks later. /.

VNA


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FRENCH COMMUNITY DAY – September 27, 2021

History of the French Community Day

The feast of the French Community was celebrated for the first time in 1975. This day commemorates an important event of the Belgian Revolution during which the royal army failed to take back Brussels from the Walloon revolutionaries.

At the beginning of the 19th century, the Belgians were unhappy under the rule of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands. On August 25, 1830, a riot broke out after, among other things, the performance of Daniel Auber’s patriotic opera “La muette de Portici”. This led to an uprising in which crowds rushed to the streets and took control of government buildings while shouting patriotic slogans.

At the time, the Estates General convinced Crown Prince William, who represented the monarchy in Brussels, that the administrative separation of north and south was the only solution to alleviate the crisis. However, the father of the crown prince, King William I, rejected the proposed accommodation conditions. Later, the royal army was unable to retake Brussels and a provisional government was declared in Brussels after which the Dutch troops withdrew.

When we talk about the French Community of Belgium, we are referring to the French-speaking population who reside in the Walloon Region. They constitute around 41% of the country’s population and around 80% of French-speaking Belgians reside in Wallonia. In fact, this community, also known as the Wallonia-Brussels Federation, has its own parliament, government, administration and flag.

In June 1975, the French Community chose the date of September 27 as the French Community Day. On the day of the French Community, all schools are closed, however, some businesses remain open. People celebrate the holiday with concerts, theatrical performances and sporting events.


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The legacy of Prince Philip’s frog jump in a francophone community in Manitoba

Philip married then Princess Elizabeth in 1947. He was the longest-serving royal consort in British history and, in his role, made many trips to Canada.

Manitoba Premier Brian Pallister said on Friday that Philip was in direct contact with thousands of Manitobans from his first visit in 1951 to his last in 2010.

Gagné was a child when the royal couple came to the province for Manitoba’s centennial in 1970.

He said the community was chosen to host the royal family because they wanted to experience the “true color of a French-Canadian village”. At the time, more than 80% of the population of St-Pierre-Jolys was French-speaking.

A party was planned for the visit and the whole village was decorated.

“I couldn’t believe they were building this stage in the middle of town in front of our Catholic cathedral,” Gagné said.

But the village wanted to make an even bigger impression on the queen and her husband.

“We are surrounded here by Mennonites, Ukrainians, Germans, Hutterites, etc. One of our nicknames is the frog, of course,” said Gagné.

“We said, ‘Let’s take this and start the Frog Follies. “”

The mayor challenged other local politicians, mayors and prefects to present their best frog. And, thus, began the frog jumping competition.

People searched ponds for Northern Leopard Frogs, Manitoba’s largest frog, typically five to 11 centimeters long.

Two Court of Queen’s Bench judges and a doctor were among the judges who crowned George the winning frog, having jumped just over 2.1 meters, and marked the start of the annual Frog Follies.

The festival grew over the following decades to become one of Manitoba’s premier summer adventures. The weekend event draws over 1,000 people every day to the village of just under 1,200 people.

However, it was canceled last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gagné said that while the royal couple’s visit was short and he didn’t think he saw any frogs, it had an impact that spanned more than five decades.

He said Philip, in particular, was happy to find pockets of French Canadians in a largely English-speaking province.

Gagné said he was thinking of Prince Philip’s family at the moment.

“He lived a busy life.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published on April 10, 2021.

Kelly Geraldine Malone, The Canadian Press


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Obituary: Jacqueline Munro-Lafon, dean of the French community in Scotland

JACQUELINE Munro-Lafon was the oldest member of the French community in Scotland, an emblematic and much appreciated figure. On February 13, she died peacefully in Glasgow, in the presence of her son and daughter-in-law, fifteen days after her hundredth birthday.

Jacqueline Lafon was born in 1921, in Paris like four generations of her family before. His father was a wine merchant and the family lived in the Latin Quarter, that alluring fusion of bourgeois elegance, intellectual research and student buzz. After leaving school, she embarked on a journalism degree, her life apparently mapped out. World War II would change everything.

The Franco-British military defeat, following the German invasion of France in 1940, intimidated French parliamentarians into voting to liquidate the Republic, leaving de Gaulle in London to continue fighting for the honor of France and its freedoms . Jacqueline, the so-called journalist, could only mentally record the material misery and arbitrary terror of the Occupation that followed.

In those four interminable years, one of his worst memories was the breakdown of trust: the dangerous words really cost lives. Things got complicated in August 1944, when General Leclerc’s division of the Free French Army arrived near Paris, causing a week of urban warfare. The family home, poorly located near the German army headquarters at the Luxembourg Palace, was at the center of the storm, its windows shattered by shrapnel.

Immediately after the liberation of Paris, Jacqueline volunteered for the French army and was assigned to the British forces as a liaison officer. During the following months, in the devastated German cities and the liberated concentration camps, the young second lieutenant attends many scenes which she always hesitates to repeat.

The war also changed her life more happily, as in the military she met Major Hamish Munro. They get married in Paris and, with demobilization, go to live in England: three children follow. It was not until 1960 that they moved to Glasgow, where Hamish worked as a business consultant.

This is where they settle, because Jacqueline immediately falls in love with Scotland, and Glasgow in particular, where she immediately feels at home. She had a collection of illustrative stories.

She would remember, for example, taking the bus a little nervously a few weeks after arriving in town and asking the driver where to get off. Another passenger, disembarking at the same time, kindly offered to escort him to his destination. Arrived some distance away, Jacqueline asked her guide if her own house was nearby, to which the lady replied that she was returning to the bus stop, since she lived several kilometers away.

In England, Jacqueline had always felt that many, however polite they were, showed a certain coldness, as if they did not want to forgive the French for 1940. But now, suddenly, the selfless and modest gesture of a foreigner brought tears to her eyes. Long before the slogan became mainstream, Jacqueline learned that people make Glasgow.

Jacqueline was a loving daughter, sister, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. Her family was at the center of her life. That said, his warmth, liveliness and interest in others has earned him a large circle of friends far beyond.

His ability to listen and his constant desire to provide support have kept this friendship alive. In the public part of her constant activity, she immersed herself in the lives of her compatriots in Scotland. She was the librarian of the French Institute in Glasgow and a staunch supporter of the French Cultural Delegation, the Alliance Française and Franco-Scottish Society.

She volunteered without hesitation to help, whether that was running a polling station for the French elections, organizing Christmas presents for the children, or giving free of her time when help was needed. This sustained contribution to the invisible but real Auld Alliance between Scotland and France was recognized by the French government when Jacqueline became Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres.

Before her newly married daughter left for Britain in 1945, her father, himself a Great War Cross of War, solemnly reminded her that she was to be French Ambassador. This mission that she accomplished on a daily basis, with energy and charm.

It was fitting that on the occasion of the hundredth birthday of this modest ambassador, in a room filled with letters and cards, the Queen’s message of congratulations should be seated next to a bouquet of flowers sent by a Consul General attentive to Edinburgh, on behalf of a sad but grateful French community.

Jacqueline remained vibrant until the end. If proof were needed, one would only need to check out the exuberant presentation she gave at Strathclyde University, for over an hour, when she was almost 99 years old (https://www.youtube .com / watch? v = 93FOtLNVrLQ & t = 490s).

This joie de vivre is not the whole story. Jacqueline not only experienced painful episodes, such as life-threatening cancer requiring major surgery, shortly after losing her beloved husband.

There was also a sudden and overwhelming personal grief, with the loss of her daughter Fiona, her stepdaughter Geraldine and her granddaughter Alex’s husband, all at a young age. As with her traumatic war experiences, she never let this suffering take over, supported by a Christian faith dear to her.

To the world, she remained the always elegant and endearing Jacqueline, bright and cheerful, always ready to help and share, to chat and to laugh. Even in dark times, Jacqueline continued to radiate light and warmth around her. It is not only France and Scotland, but our common humanity that has lost a beloved ambassador.

John campbell


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Franco-Ontarian flag hoisted at Town Hall in honor of the French community

Hundreds of young French students flooded the town hall square on Thursday to attend the raising ceremony of a flag that could end up floating forever.

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Hundreds of young French students flooded the town hall square on Thursday to attend the raising ceremony of a flag that could end up floating forever.

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About 450 students from the French Catholic School Board were transported by bus to witness the hoisting of the Franco-Ontarian flag in honor of its 41st birthday.

Students and local staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Students are introduced during the event.  (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star)
Students and local staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Students are introduced during the event. (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star) Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

Mayor Drew Dilkens spoke at the event and said he wanted the flag to be a permanent feature of the New Town Hall.

“I am going to present a notice of motion and ask the municipal council to install a permanent Franco-Ontarian flag when the new town hall opens in 2018, in recognition of the fact that this whole neighborhood was built by French settlers and was really started by French settlers, ”Dilkens said. “I think it’s important to recognize that permanently.

Elizabeth Brito, of the Association canadienne-française de l’Ontario, said there are about 30,000 people in the French community in the Windsor area. This year’s census will give a clearer picture of the actual number, but she said it appears to be increasing.

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The flag should fly at city hall, she said, to represent this large population.

“It is important to hoist the Franco-Ontarian flag here in Windsor to reflect the French presence in Chatham-Kent and especially here in Windsor,” said Brito.

Students and staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as French citizens of the region celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Students and staff are presented during the event.  (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star)
Students and staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as French citizens of the region celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Students and staff are presented during the event. (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star) Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

She said the flag, created in 1975, was first hoisted in Sudbury. The flag is green and white to represent summer and winter, with a trillium and a lily on it.

The anniversary isn’t actually until September 25, Brito said, but organizers have organized the event a few days in advance for logistical reasons.

“It will be a few days of celebration,” Brito said.

Local students and staff with the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Lucrece Powo, a grade 6 student from Æ?  The EnvolŽe school in Windsor is shown during the event.  (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star)
Local students and staff with the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Lucrece Powo, a grade 6 student from Æ? The EnvolŽe school in Windsor is shown during the event. (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star) Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star

Dilkens said the Franco-Ontarian flag should be flown permanently over City Hall, after so many groups were only given the honor temporarily, due to the important role of the French community in the history of Windsor.

“We’re talking about building the community,” Dilkens said. “We are not talking about church flags or any other type of flag. We are talking about people who made a significant contribution to the community to found it.

“I think it’s appropriate to recognize that our nation understands that we are bilingual, that we have two official languages. It is fitting that the City of Windsor recognizes its settlers and founders.

Students and staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Isaac LeGood, a grade 9 student from the he EJ Lajeunesse High School in Windsor was ready for the event.  (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star)
Students and staff from the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Isaac LeGood, a grade 9 student from the he EJ Lajeunesse High School in Windsor was ready for the event. (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star) Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star
Students and local staff with the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens takes speaking at the event.  (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star)
Students and local staff with the French Catholic School Board as well as local French citizens celebrated Franco-Ontarian Flag Day at Windsor Town Hall on Thursday, September 22, 2016. Windsor Mayor Drew Dilkens takes speaking at the event. (DAN JANISSE / The Windsor Star) Photo by Dan Janisse /Windsor Star


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Edmonton’s Francophone community is growing despite fears that the culture will be passed on – Edmonton

EDMONTON – Edmonton’s Francophone community has prospered in recent years, according to the French Quartered Business Association, but some fear it will not be sustainable.

Jean Johnson, executive director of the association, said there are more than 30,000 people in Edmonton whose mother tongue is French and between 80,000 and 85,000 who speak the language.

He said that historically, French-speaking citizens came to Edmonton and Alberta because of the economy.

“What is really done is culturally diverse presence of [the Francophones] so that today’s Francophone community reflects Alberta civil society in terms of cultural diversity, ”said Johnson.

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Johnson said La Cité francophone has helped create a hub for the community to come together for programs and events.

“I think that for other Edmontonians, this is an opportunity for people to come and discover a multi-ethnic Francophone community right here at La Cité francophone,” he said.

Ginette Boulianne can attest to this. Boulianne grew up speaking French in Saskatchewan. When she moved to Alberta in 2000, she said it was important to find a francophone community,

“I was delighted to see how vibrant and healthy the Francophone community in Edmonton was,” she said.

Boulianne said Francophone culture is such a priority that she comes from Sherwood Park to spend time at La Cité francophone, take her daughter to Francophone dance classes, or participate in events such as the Flying Canoe Festival.

“French culture is still part of who I am. That’s wonderful. It’s great that there are opportunities to do things in French and meet people who share the same culture, ”she said.

Johnson said it’s important for the French community to have a presence in the city because Canada is, technically, a bilingual country.

“Canada strengthens the values ​​of cultural diversity and linguistic duality. I think that we reflect these two values ​​as a community of the fact that we are French-speaking and of the fact that we have brought this enormous wealth of these various cultures coming from African cultures and from all over Europe, ”he said. .

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But Lisette Trottier, spokesperson for the Association canadienne-française de l’Alberta – Edmonton chapter, said there were concerns that the French-speaking culture in the city was not sustainable.

Trottier, who is also a French immersion teacher, said 70 percent of Francophones either lose their ability to speak French or have never learned their parents’ language.

She said integration into culture often comes down to places where you can use the French language or activities that involve French heritage or culture.

“Living in a minority situation is a bit going against the grain. It’s just easier to assimilate and do like everyone else. I have often had to justify why I choose to do things in French, ”she said.

Trottier said one way to compensate for assimilation is to create more spaces, like La Cité, for Francophone residents and to create events that are not exclusive to Francophones.

“We do not only invite the Francophone community to events, but the entire community so that they can get to know us. We are better understood and people who have this real interest can also be part of this community. “


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